Koreans sweep Masters titles to end the bowling competition in the 15th Asian Games

    12/11/06

    15th Asian Games

    Qatar Bowling Center in Doha, Qatar (Dec. 3-10, 2006)

    2006AsianGamesLogo_small.jpg 2006MWCKORJoNamYi_small.jpgTop-seeded Jo Nam-Yi (r.) from Korea followed in the foot prints of women's champion Choi Jin A, when he defeated defending champion Remy Ong, Singapore, 455-411 over two games total pinfall to win the men' Masters title at the 15th Asian Games in Doha, Qatar.

    After Ong flew past the second Korean, Choi Bok Eum, in the opening match, 259-195, Nam Yi jumped out to a 22-pin lead after the first game (221-199). Ong managed to improve his scores by 13 pins in game two, but Nam Yi matched his feat, winning the game and the match, 234-212.

    A clean sweep for the Koreans, who brought both players men and women into the stepladder finals, and a well-deserved victory for Nam Yi. Ong was consoled with the silver medal after winning three titles at the 2002 Asian Games. Bok Eum receibed the bronze medal.


    15th Asian Games - Men's Masters Finals


    Qatar Bowling Center in Doha, Qatar (Dec. 3-10, 2006)

    Championship Round:
    1. Jo Nam-Yi, Korea, 455 (2 game)
    2. Remy Ong, Singapore, 670 (3 games)
    3. Choi Bok Eum, Korea, 195 (1 game)

    Playoff Results:
    Semi-final Match: Ong def. Bok Eum, 259-195.
    Title Match: Nam Yi (221+234) def. Ong (199+212), 455-411.


    Both Koreans and defending champion Ong to bowl for men's Masters title


    2006AsianGamesLogo_small.jpg 2006MWCKORJoNamYi_small.jpg Jo Nam-Yi from Korea is the top seed for the men's Masters finals in the 15th Asian Games at the Qatar Bowling Center in Doha.

    Like his female counterpart, Choi Jin A in the women's finals, Nam Yi led already after the first 8-game block on long oil and never looked back. The bronze medalist in Singles and All Events at the World Championships in Busan, Korea, earlier this year, won all but one match on Sunday on the short pattern for 3805 pinfall total, a new Asian Games record, including the field-best 13-3 won-loss record.

    2006MWCRemyOng_small.jpg "All good things come to those who wait" is a proverb that couldn't be more appropriate for Remy Ong from Singapore. The defending Asian Games Masters champion (2002 in Busan, Korea) started the day in fifth position.

    Ong, who won the gold medals in Singles (on short oil) and All Events at the World Championships (2006 in Busan, Korea) fired games of 255, 247, 248, 228, 258, 233, 225 and 253 on the short pattern (243.38 average) to leap into second place with the field-best 3678 pinfall, a 229.88 average (to Nam Yi's 229.69) and a 3768 total due to a 9-7 won-loss record.

    2006MWCChoiBokEum_small.jpg Ong overtook Nam Yi's teammate Choi Bok Eum in the final game. Bok Eum closed out with a disastrous 162-game, which almost cost him his spot in the stepladder. However, His 3689 total and 10-6 match play record was 20 pins better than Wu Siu Hong's 3669.

    Bok Eum will meet Remy Ong in the opening match, while the Asian Championships Masters champ from Hong Kong had to settle for fourth place. Alex Liew from Malaysia landed in fifth place (3661) mere eight pins behind Siu Hong.

    The top 16 men in All Events - but only two players from one country in each division - advanced to Masters play. They bowled two blocks of 8 games - Saturday on long oil (45 feet), Sunday on short oil (35 feet)) - to cut the top 3 who will bowl for the prestigious Masters title in a stepladder final.


    Men's All Events - Standings after 16 Games Round Robin (long/short)





    Koreans take the lead in men's Masters after the first block


    2006AsianGamesLogo.jpg 2006MWCKORJoNamYi_small.jpg Jo Nam Yi and Choi Bok Eum, both from Korea, have positioned themselves atop the men's leaderboard in the Asian Games Masters event after the first block of eight games round robin on long oil.

    Despite finishing with a 189-game, Nam Yi (pictured) led the field of 16 players from eleven countries with 1851 pinfall total. Nam Yi averaged 223.88 and compiled a 6-2 won-loss record. Players receive 10 pins bonus for each win.

    2006MWCChoiBokEum_small.jpg Bok Eum (left) closed out the block with a huge 277-game to jump into second place with 1818 including 50 bonus. Third place belongs to Hassan Al Shaik from Saudi Arabia, who checked in with 1787 (5-3).

    2006BWCSaeedAlHajri_small.jpg Local hero Saaed Al Hajri (right) delighted the crowd when he tied Nam Yi for the best match play record (6-2) en route to sit in fourth place with 1774. Defending Asian Games Masters champion Remy Ong from Singapore is fifth with 1771 after going 4-4 in match play.

    2006EBT18WuSiuHong_small.jpg Asian Championships Masters champion Wu Siu Hong (left) from Hong Kong had the highest game of the day (279) and is currently in sixth place with 1768 (4-4).

    The top 16 en in All Events - but only two players from one country in each division - advanced to Masters play. They bowl two blocks of 8 games - Saturday on long oil (45 feet), Sunday on short oil (35 feet)) - to cut the top 3 who will bowl for the prestigious Masters title in a stepladder final.

    With 12th placed Somjed Kusonphithak from Thailand (1701) mere 86 pins off the top 3, everything is possible during the final block. The top two players in All Events, gold medalist Bader Al Shaik and silver medalist Nayef Oqab, who found themselves in unfamiliar positions at the bottom of the table in 14th and 15th place with 1626 and 1595, have to make up a lot of ground if they want to bowl for the medals.


    Men's All Events - Standings after 8 Games Round Robin